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involved. that's where we're at right now with the obama care. i'm not a health care expert but you don't have to be to see what's going wrong. this plan is not workable. why does he not realize that? why are we worried about poll numbers? this is not working. it's a disaster. why does he not acknowledge it? why are liberals marching into the white house to get a message down? why are we having nuclear talks on thursday about 51 votes? this is an emergency. he would defuse a lot of resistance if he would admit this is the point we're at right now. >> yes, bob, answer all that -- >> first of all, for -- let me make a point he ought to go back. there are two presidents who had lower ratings and came way back up. so that's the answer to your -- your point. in this case, you don't believe it works. eric, nobody around this table with the exception of me thinks there's probably some hope for it. obama believes it works. he thinks there's a way. now, you can argue the policy. and if it is impossible, obama's presidency is pretty much over. >> i don't think he really believed it's going to wor
don't want to talk about kennedy anymore. people are so eager. i can't imagine any other president about whom there is that sort of feeling. >> we have a few more weeks. i want to play it out and we do have a wonderful event here a few weeks ago sponsored by the open university of kennedy -- what kennedy and lincoln's second term would it look like and you asked would he have persuaded to ask congress to pass legislation involving civil rights? on that count would he have achieved what johnson achieved? >> i don't think he would have had the great society energy and commitment that johnson had because kennedy was essentially a foreign-policy president. that is to say politics can unseat you but foreign politics can kill you. he would have run against barry goldwater and would have won it did victory the way johnson did. he would have carried big democratic majorities into the house and senate with him and i think he would have gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills passed. that would have put him in the lead with the most progr
they insist i get it, they don't want to seem selfish and put themselves on it, but i found things to love about obama care after all. no kidding, you know what, i found out under obama care, i am going to have dental coverage for children. i saw this spot by delta dental from virginia. >> okay, okay. >> great, great. weather where would you like the baby car seat. >> no, i don't have kids. >> it doesn't matter the government said you have to buy it. >> where should i put. it >> smile, smile. >> yeah, you know the fact that my own children are grown and on theiron and have their own children is immaterial. i am man dated to carry dental insurance for the children we don't have. and while you think that is unnecessary, i found out under obama care, i also have maternitiy benefits. yes, (applause) it is man dated and so i am going to have it whether i ask for it or not. some people complain the government forcing me to buy something i can't or don't need much i am a glass half full. i so it as a good thing. i am 58-year-old male, and while it is unlikely that i am going to get pregnant and g
like that for the people whom you are going to benefit, actually. i don't want to knock the idea that the thing is entirely useless but the whole thing is predicated on the assumption that somehow you can get rid of illegal immigrants. and therefore, what we want to do is come up with a set of penalties and incentives which will somehow reduce the influx of new illegal immigrants and will somehow get rid of the stop of illegal immigrants. and i don't think that those are possible feasible objectives. and for the very simple reason that each time we try and do something like this, at the washington level, things really get worse for the illegal immigrants and we don't really gain anything in terms of what is commonly known as controlling our borders. and the main reason is that we have a right brain-left brain approach to illegal immigrants. the right brain says they are immigrants and therefore we should be kind to them. we should be considerate to them. but the left brain says oh but they're illegal and therefore we believe in the rule of law and therefore we should be unkind to
of the free world. it has a great role to play. i don't think it has been playing that role in the '50s, and therefore, i think the democratic party has an historic function in the 1960 election. >> don't you think that the republicans are sure to run on peace and prosperity, and since we are at peace and the nation is prosperous, can they be beaten on those issues? >> yes, i think they can be beaten. i think really the problem of the democratic party is to attempt to bring home to the people the kind of problems that we are going to face in the 1960s, also to bring home to the american people that we haven't really faced these problems in the 1950s. when mr. eisenhower leaves office in 1960, we are going to be faced, the next incumbent, with overwhelming problems. we are going to be faced with a missile gap, which will make the difficulties of negotiating with the soviet union and the chinese in the '60s extremely difficult. when mr. coolidge left the white house in 1928, he was hailed. he was an extremely popular chief executive. i don't think he was popular in 1930. >> mr. reston. >>
with runups like this, especially for companies who don't make money -- they have a great deal of promise but don't make money -- really back to larry's point about the internet boom and whether we're getting back to that. a lot of good features of the boom, included amazon.com and ebay, still with us today but many others are not. do you worry we're potentially repeating sinful behavior. >> one thing we learned from the past four or five years issue when we put our money to work, there's a certain risk tolerance everybody has, and markets are more aware of risk powers individually and institutions than ever before. the market in great part -- the pricing mechanism we have is developed and is decided upon by the investing public and the reply and demand ratio. so i have to believe that people getting into these things at these prices are happy to be there and happy to have the opportunity to participate or they would not be paying these prices. >> larry, without getting into the valuation of the company, whether it's worth in the mid-40s or whatever, it does raise another question about j
's comedian jack small. >> i don't have anything in that wild tirade. all right, will they right this oversight? it's the list that rocked the nation with shame and horror. the website medite. the 50 sexiest in the tv news and it's in a snub for the ages, none of the red eye staff is represented. now the usual sexy suspects are anderson cooper, laura logan and shaq, of course. >> i thought they said news? >> you're terrible. but none of us made the cut. not even andy levy's baby blue eyes. red eye asked mediaite for a sample. >> horrifying. do you know what's in these snubs? please include your answers, the guys from red eye. >> somebody should have been rented from the show. come on, one of you guys should have been on there. >> it should be me. >> it should have been you. why do pilateates if you're not going to make the list. the stench in a male pilates class is terrible. >> i don't even know if i can talk about this story, i'm so angry, greg. are you telling me that the bags under my eyes from my insomnia, screw you matt willstein, screw you everyone. >> maybe if you had scr
there's a sort of a code of respect among presidents, recent presidents. they don't call each other names like this. cheney, is he exempt there the rule? >> no, he's not exempt there the rule. but he made himself exempt. i don't think you'll hear george w. bush making a statement like that. but dick cheney has a different agenda. first of all, his daughter is run fog are the senate in wyoming as a tea party candidate, rather absurdly, since she's basically from the beltway. and dick cheney is trying to help her out by appealing to the tea party worst. i think that's what's going on, number one. number two i think republicans more generally, chris, have always been infuriated by the high personal standarding of president barack obama. by him sz a candidate. by him as a president. by the fact that he has seen to many of his supporters and to most americans, to be an honest, straightforward, decent guy. and this somehow is especially infuriating to republicans. it drives them crazy, and they're doing everything they can now given the opportunity to try to drag him down to their level.
they don't know how the suspects managed to control the victims for so long. >>> the chemist inside of a massive crime scandal in massachusetts has been sentenced to prison. annie ducan has admitted to falsifying records and led to release of hundreds of drug convicts. that's it for the headlines. america tonight is up next and remember, you can always get the latest on aljazeera.com. >> on america tonight: the journey we'll never forget. the story of president kennedy's lasting legacy and his last voyage. >> we have the transfer of power, the official of state business, going on just a few feet in front. and here we have the private horror of a widow with her murdered husband. >> also tonight, fading away, capturing what might be the last looks of a vanishing culture. >> i believe these people have a wealth, an emotional wealth, cultural wealth that we do not have any more. >> and big dreams, small space. adam may: little tread. >> it will always be my place. >> it won't get away. >> from the museum in washington, d.c. and the three shots were fired exhibit focused on the assassi
look, here's the bottom line. i don't want to rely to which on the polls. when you look at the cbs poll where 43% say repeal the thing outright, they know there's not a majority for that right now and that the republicans are going to keep pushing to defund it, repeal it, et cetera. i think more worrisome is that the cbs poll says change this law. the president tried to stall and buy more time by doing this executive fix. it's not really clear that he has executive power to delay these cancellation notices by one year. he's got the state insurance commissioners here at the white house trying to convince them to go along with this plan but you know full well it's not just republicans any more on the hill, there are some moderate democrats as well in the senate, in the house, demanding changes to this law. to answer your question what's going to happen, i still don't think the law is going to be repealed so it's not going to be fully implemented as you asked, but are there going to be real substantive changes to this law? i think that's becoming more and more likely when you have this dem
, the autopsy, -- on the evidence, the ballistics, the autopsy. we don't try to make it into a false hero. he show that the case was always soft but that he brought out a lot of evidence that was later used in became important. tavis: a lot of things -- it occurs to me every time i see it with castingo do and you directing and a lot to do with their gifts and their talents, but the acting in this just holds up. these guys are so gifted. sutherland and costner, the entire cast, tommy lee jones. >> everyone is a face. is incredible. gary oldman as oswald. i love the cast. --re were seven signposts there were signposts. it is a competent story and the audience could lose some of those signposts. you remember who the people are. to ask if youoing thought this project may have been received different leave he did not have an all-star cast of a with less recognizable cases. we might've gotten lost in the storyline. >> i think it helped a lot. it was a fun movie in terms of tension. it keeps your interest. it grips you. it was a rough opening because, although we got eight nominations, oscar nominat
combat troops. >> mismanagement. >> i don't know that you have any evidence to say that. >> he was aware of that. i don't know if he is in that. the kennedy presidency, however short it was was more than vietnam. he walked us back from the brink of nuclear war. he inspired young people to public service and elevated the feelings about what government could do, at the same time, the famous line in the inaugural speech he asked much of the american people. the state's program, peace corp, these are all significant achievements we remember him for today. patt is right, he is frozen in time. he'll always be young and popular. he certainly shows what a president can achieve against many odds. >> peace corp was a big one. >> 200,000 people. 139 countries. certainly his legacy is creating the peace corp. it is the presidency that was about image and there are a lot of unanswered questions. would they have escalated the war in vietnam. would they have left the conflict to the country to deal with. that's a lot that's unknown. a lot will never be known. he won on charisma and the fact he looked g
screw around with the power of the president? i don't think u.s. steel or any other companies want internal rev enough agents checking expense accounts. want government to go back to he tell bills to fine out who was with you? these are real quotes. now, if the kens were prepared to do this to stop a steel price hike, what they do to keep the presidency in their hands? some of you know i worked for robert kennedy. no public figure i admired more. but this this dark side. they get away with it but people know that something is up. one of those underground things that know. it's all kind of underground. last, 1968. what happens? so here are two notions. if there's no war in vietnam, then richard nixon's most powerful argument for the presidency -- i know the world, i know the soviet union, i can bring peace to vietnam -- is irrelevant, and the republicans can find somebody who could actually win elections, say the governorship of california by a million votes. reagan made a very lame last minute bid for the nomination. take away the vietnam war, nixon's strong point, and i realize t
the president's been shot. and i said to her, don't be spreading rumors like that. but with that, someone came to get me, and we went into the waiting room, you know, with everyone else, and we watched television just like everyone else did. and then the series of orders came to me, because i was medical officer. it happened just as fate would have it. medical officer of the day. and so i got orders to go first to the white house, second to the capitol and third to the grave site. >> let's start with the white house. this was the first time you'd been inside the white house? >> first time i'd been inside the white house. i'd been in the rose garden a couple times. and on the lawn with my camera. and i only have one picture of president kennedy in the rose garden, and he's standing on the porch with someone else. i can't remember who it is. but i had not been inside the white house until that, until i got posted there. and i was -- the body was in the east room. the casket was in the east room. and the greenroom is where all of the dignitaries gathered. the east room runs north and south. the w
identified six victims but four remain. >> where are the bodies? >> what bodies? i don't know anything bit. >> in his words, girl near heelsburg. girl on mount tam. girl from miami. girl from berkeley. >> who are those women? >> you tell me. >> i don't know. you know. >> you're still playing games. >> nochlt ask the prosecution. i judge. i don't know. >> nayso says he's saving the true meaning for aprily. he won't explain why he didn't use the information if it would have helped the case. >> that is my family picture. >> i pressed him on this bizarre photo that he took of mannequins. he applied make up and dressed in lingerie. >> you've got ten. does that correspond to your list of ten? >> no. no. it doesn't. >> sit for the women you killed? >> no. no. >> he kept pictures and momentos in a safe deposit box 1 woman, apparently dead at the friem her waist down. her husband identified her by under wear she wore. >> he's wrong. >> who's photograph was sna >> a lady from the waist down you kept in your safe deposit box. have you no idea who it was? >> no. >> did you take it? >> i don't remembe
what really happen. i don't think it is going to happen in my lifetime. we are learning of all of the details of fdr and fascinating and gives me confidence that history will catch up to this. too many political forces were at work and no one wanted to know the details. >> it is fascinating our children will know and how will they figure it out? >> if you read the bocks about fdr and new books about john kennedy and there is just evidence and testimony that comes forward and when people who know the kenned kens personally or have a political agenda past and historians look at just the evident carefully more detail begins to emerge. i saw a poll that said 80 percent of the members of the media believe in the lone gunmen theory and 70 percent of the american public believe in a conspiracy and most people don't realize in 1979 house select committee on assassinations concluded it was a conspiracy. and so we'll wait, we'll wait to so. at least you are not crazy fubelieve that now. >> doug, thank you so much for your perspective and all of your historical context. i know you will be
republicans really don't like. by invoking this option, the president will be able to get things done. just look at this. right now there are eight judges on the powerful d.c. circuit court. four democrats, four republicans and three sets are open. with that split in power, the court has overturned the president's regulation on financial reform on recess appointments. most recently, a panel on the court struck down obama care's contraception mandate. but with yesterday's decision, this court will become 7-4 democratic. one of the biggest road blocks to the president's agenda will be gone. growing up in brooklyn, i learned one thing, you have to stand up to the neighborhood bully. president obama and the democrats have done just that. joining me now are melissa harris perry and susan milligan. thank you both for coming on the show. >> absolutely. >> thanks, reverend. >> melissa, let me start with you. >> yep. >> are republicans angry about this change because they've lost a tool to obstruct the president? >> i think that's right. i do think that members of the u.s. senate take very seriously
like him. i don't know. i fear the death of the medical profession. let's ask our guest. here now is dr. bill grace, also with us tonight, democratic strategist chris cofinas, heather and jim pethokoukis from the american enterprise institute. bill grace, let me start with you. are they just pricing doctors out? is this a deliberate strategy? 20 bucks a visit or -- that's crazy, absolutely crazy. >> they thought they had everything worked out on the front end of this whole deal. and you know what a disaster these turned out to be. i don't think they had any idea what they were going to do on the back end. but no one thought we were going to get more money from this. we were all thinking this was going to be -- if you remember two months ago, i said this was medicaid plus. slightly better reimbursement than medicaid. >> there's a long-term trend here. both for medicare and medicaid, to keep slicing an slicing and slicing down. hospital reimbursements, doctor reimbursements. this is part of that trend. why? why won't they reward doctors? >> basically they compare the price of physicians i
oppose them, peace effort with iran which is historic right now. don't forget to include people like ted cruz who jump aboard the bandwagon. to make the points both of you guys make, we've got a lot of tape right now to show that tells how we got to this important day historically and an opportunity for peace. even as far back as the 2008 debates as you guys said, president obama was then a u.s. senator, made crystal clear what he would do as president. and he's done it. first on iraq. >> so i have said very clearly i will end this war, we will not have a permanent occupation, and we will not have permanent bases in iraq. >> and in december of 2011, the last convoy of american troops left iraq. next health care. the president made a promise and delivered. >> i'm absolutely committed to making sure that anybody in america who needs health care is going to get it. >> and the president's affordable care act is law. and on iran during a january 2008 debate, the president drew a contrast between himself and then his opponent at the time, then-senator hillary clinton regarding iran. let's list
. [laughter] >> i don't think it works for that. >> oh, okay. >> thank you very much for coming. >> yeah. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i think regardless where you are on the political spectrum, we are fortunate and grateful we live in the united states of america. it's a very unique place, and if america was considered to be a product, and we do try to sell our product overseas, what's our brand? i think our brand is a constitution, the rule of law, and our value system. under that brand and under that value system, there is that notion of equal under the eyes of the law, and i know that brand and value system is the ada, trying to balance the rights of americans with diabetics. >> this is a treaty. a treaty is a law. the emotional and political arguments in favor of the treaty, no one can disagree with these arguments, but the question is, will the treaty have the legal effect that's being proctored by the proponents of the treaty? we don't hear citations to the articles of the treaty. we don't hear consideration of the reports, the concluding obser
, but you won't own it forever. and i pray god when the democrats take back we don't make the kind of naked power grab you are doing. >> and yesterday they made that naked power grab. how funny is that? >> in a big way. serious too. because the complexion of our senate, the complexion of how we think about laws in this nation is potentially going to change. you go from violation of democratic principles, right, that would worsen partisanship, that it will ruin our country, that you're praying it wouldn't happen -- joe biden. but mr. president today. yesterday a huge shift so they're against it. and yesterday president obama had a revelation. listen to this. >> today's pattern of obstruction just isn't normal. it's not what our founders envisioned. a deliberate and determined effort to obstruct everything, no matter what the merits, just to refight the results of an election is not normal. and for the sake of future generations we can't let it become normal. >> here's why they say they did it yesterday. because they say the president can't get any of his nominations for the courts past this
was making a suit for the first lady. >> yes. i don't remember until afterwards but my older sister tells me that it was a big topic of conversation in my house, that my father was making a suit for the first lady. >> and she wore it. she was quite pleased with it. it wasn't on this occasion only that she wore the suit. >> no, and i'm very, very happy about that. my father, from having a very faimous suit to having made a very infamous suit. i felt gratified that at least jackie got to wear the suit under happier circumstances for a period of time. because it must be really weird to have had your only claim to fame be so stained. after what happened 50 years ago today. >> yeah. did your sister recall the pride that he had in being involved in something that, at that high a level? i mean really this is the woman known even today as one of the great fashion icons of all time. he dressed her. >> yes. there was even pride after the shooting because i remember i was three years old when the assassination happened. they talked about it, but i get the sense that it was kind of a subdued way of disc
think we definitely need this reform. if that is the case, i will have to rethink mr. rubio. i don't think he's going to actually -- i don't think that's real. i just don't believe that. i don't think his biggest supporters would allow him to do something like that. go, whofore you was the leading democratic candidate, the one that would give the republicans the most difficult time? caller: obviously clinton. host: why? caller: i think a lot of people believe the reason her husband was such a good president was because she was just as good as he was. what is the matchup like with clinton versus rubio? clinton would win. host: clinton versus chris christie? caller: that would be a struggle. host: vance from oklahoma. caller: i think the best candidate for republicans in 2016 will be rand paul. i think a lot of the plagarism charges against him are really focused. aligned in extra -- extemporaneous speeches. this is really a concerted campaign to bring rand paul down. he is the oene candidate that the establishment hates the most. ns the wholet h progressive empire. and that is the r
, some of the 15 percent they don't have hamburgers because they are vegetarian and some because they would have a hot dog. so only truly five percent can't get hamburger. but with obama burger it will be raised from 5 to 7.50. that is because they will pay for the ones that don't have burgers. some will get obama burgers for free. and others will pay $2 for a $5 burger that now cost 7.50. and so many people decided they want free burger and 7.50 for $2 that the people who used to buy the $5 burger and thought they would have to pay accept.50. they are going to have to pay $10 for the burgers to make up for the difference of the free ones and reduced cost. so here's what we are going to do. we want to do our part. we'll give all of the folks here in our studio audience, a coupon. that's right. it will let them pay $10 for the $five obama burger. now, it's not a coupon that lets them have a $10 burger for $5. but a $5 burger for $10. you follow me so far? some of the customers they don't want the deluxe burger because they can't afford it. but we think that everyone should have a
this together. in a baritone voice he would say if you can't say something good about someone, don't say anything. there was so much respect for this man but along with a philip randolph, who organized the brotherhood of sleeping car porters, represented the men working on the railroad. and when you come to washington and walked through the union station there is a bus. you have martin luther king jr. who was the president of the southern christian leadership conference born in atlanta georgia and then there was roy wilkins, the head of the naacp for the advancement of colored people that were born in minnesota, a wonderful man comed then there was whitney young who was born in kentucky, the dean of social work at atlanta university and later became the head of the national urban league. there was another man by the name of james farmer. farmer had attended the little wiley college in texas, why we texas. and he was part of the dating team -- debate team. they deviated harvard and they won. the graduate study at harvard university became very involved with the naacp and was later one of
phonet so you don't interrupt the inven . with that, let me get dirty. i am shannon o'neil. i work at the council on foreign relations very focused on next month america more broadly unedited and pleasure tonight at talking with two wonderful gentleman, who have written wonderful books are really impressive impressive books about mexico. the first one on my right is ricardo ainslie. his book is called "the fight to save juarez." this book tells the story of the border city, which many of you know i've had the unfortunate tension in recent years of being not only the most violent place in mexico, but by some accounts the most spineless in the world. he tells the story of this descent into darkness of this border city through the eyes and through the stories of many people in morris, the mayor from 20,722,010. it is a newspaper photographer who patrols the streets and shows up at the house and the grandstands. it is the mistress of a mid-level cartel operator. and finally a human rights activist that is thrown in to those trying to make sense of it and protects the people inside for
? >> well, i can't imagine why anyone would think that. i don't think vice presidents should come down from anything. only two officers in the land were elected by all the people, the president and the vice president i have never known any majority or senator willing to serve as vice president if his people are willing to elect him. >> nobody thought johnson was the sending most powerful man then. "life" magazine quoted the no. 2 man in washington talking about the president's brother, robert kennedy, perhaps lbj's most bitter rival in all of washington. in all of politics. of course, to call them rivals suggested in the days before fate made him president, lbj was in the same league as bobby kennedy when it came to power, clout, significance. when it came to having a political future. >> that would have been a gross distortion of the concept of a rivalry. months later safely ensconced in the white house, lbj smoke e spoke of the misery he had felt as vice president. >> i did an independent senate, the cabinet had employees under your jurisdiction here. >> all right. >> i don't think that a
by which any future majority can change the rules. democrats said they don't intend to change the rules for supreme court nominees but in two years, in four years, in six years, it's certainly a possibility at this point. >> what about the thing in the past, what made people step back was you'll be in the minority sooner or later and then it will work against you and that kind of -- why this time did the democrats say we don't care, we know it will be in the minority and will come back and haunt us at some point but right now we're going to do it. >> what's interesting in the senate and john mccain and more senior democrats and republicans, karl levin was a democrat that voted against it, said most democrats serving now don't know what life in the minority is like. 33-55 senate democrats have only known the senate in the majority. karl levin voted against it this week and said that very same thing is that you have to think of this as an institution and not just as your personal prerogative right now. to think that -- and republicans have been rather candid in saying when we take over, a
over by a dumb looking blonde. >> host: do you editorialize in your book's? >> guest: no, i don't editorialize. i think every biographer and editorialize is in what you choose to put in. and, you know, every saint has a past and every sinner has a future. i really try and be, i try and show all sides. this is why i love biography, because you were telling the history of the time and you're trying to give a nuanced, complex picture which is what most people are. >> host: few women in history you right at that the power to stop the world simply by getting married. for five years the widow of john f. kennedy had been the house object of people's admiration and overwhelming gifts. >> guest: i wrote that in 1978. we're sitting here in 2013, and i would stand by that. >> host: did you like jackie kennedy on nasa's after you are finished? >> guest: yes. i think it to go into these books, if not liking her subject, respecting your subject. and i came out of that book with real respect for this woman. she was strong and she was a great mother. and she -- i didn't realize until years and
, would you like your son jeb to run? >> he's by far the most qualified man, but, no, i don't. i think it's a great country. there are a lot of great families. it's not just four families or whatever. there are other people out there that are very qualified. we've had enough bushes. >> were you surprised by what she said? >> i was surprised she even answered the question. >> really? >> this was woman when i was getting recalled to run against governor anne richards in texas. a long pause, she says, you can't win. >> keeping you from getting a big head. >> anyways, jeb should run for president, if he wants to, he'd be a good president. >> and good morning, it is wednesday, november 20th. is it only wednesday, really? >> only wednesday. >> gracious. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set is msnbc contributor mark barnacle. you look nice. >> thank you. >> do you have running shoes on? >> i do. >> ah, all right. all right. former treasury official and "morning joe" economic specialist, jim ratner. >> do i look nice? >> always. >> and from the huffington post sam stein. >> i know i look nice
, that people were saying joseph paul franklin would suffer from this injection? >> i really don't care about it. justice was done. 33 years, they did what they did, he did the crime and trying to pay for it now. i don't care about the drug or whatever. i wish i was there, i wanted to be there, i wish i could have shot the drug up in him. >> you wish you could have done it yourself? >> i wish coy have done it myself. >> we want to change directions here. the stabbing of craigh des by his own are son. aaron alexis unsuccessfully tried to get help from the virginia and in the state senator dees his son aunt received a mental health evaluation the night before his attempted murder suicide. he was turned away we learn because the state had no beds. the claim that was denied. >> gus dedees, spied the troopers and first responders efforts he did die at the scene. >> the death of gus dees is investigated as a murder-suicide murder-suicide. state senator craigh dees was stabbed several times. >> his son, austin c. dees had an altercation at the dees residence. dees was able to leave the scene on foot an
generation. when you look at this, it really is a line between optimism and realism. i don't want to say it's pessimism, but maybe the country was headed down to a rough period between 64 and frankly 80. maybe it was inevitable whether he lived or died, but you can't help but see this was an important marker. >> i think you guys in your generation, there is the 60s like 1961 to 1970. the calendar years. there is the 60s that gani believe with the death of kennedy. that brought on the drugs and rebelliousness. when he was alive it was frank sinatra and very conventional. it's like mad men if you want to get a taste of it. conventional and guys in wing tipped shoes and having martinis and chasing girls. it was different. after that it was the beatles and a baroque period and it was not happy, but an effort to be happy. >> it is. we can spend a whole hour on this, but i will try to put other stuff in. the good news we get to spend three hours with ow this tonight. good stuff. you can watch both specials. first at 7:00. it will be jfk, the day that changed america. 8:00, watch the kennedy broth
about vietnam. i said it to kenny o'donnell and charlie bartlett, we don't have a prayer of staying in vietnam. those people hate us. they're going to throw our asss out of there at am any point but i can't give up the territory to the viet cong. every word of that comes from john kennedy's mouth. that's what he said. so, my belief is that he would have gotten out. but not frontally. he was conscious enough of the problems not to, for instance, good on television and say, my fellow americans, we can't win here. we just -- no matter how strong we are no matter how many people we put in vietnam, we can't win this because -- it's not central to american security. that domino theory i once espoused, the philippines will not be threatened if south vietnam fall, which was the belief of many policymakers. so he kind of stalls through '64. when the pt boats are attacked he does not ask for a gulf of tonkin resolution help doesn't want to be given a blank check because the hawks will demand i cash it. and in 1964 he has a second summit meeting with nikita khrushchev, which was on the table,
, veteran political analyst larry sabato. it's kind of like, i don't know, deja vu all over again. the white house is capitulating. the insurance companies can do it better. this is where we started. why don't we just stay there and let the insurance companies do that? why do we need this gigantic state-run bureaucracy? >> well, the insurance companies selling obama care policies is just a stopgap. they still expect to get the exchange up and running. they're simply trying to make sure it doesn't all go kaput between now and then. secondly, the catastrophic medicare thing was a, bipartisan, b, kind of a small law. it wasn't going to discredit anybody's political career, certainly not president reagan's. so i don't think that the obama people are going to give up the ghost quite as quickly as dan rostenkowski and ronald reagan did. >> okay. maybe. so small is a relative term. larry sabato, welcome. what do you think on this? look, i know absolute outright repeal seems very unlikely. now i get that. but you have this tremendous revolt in the house, 39 democrats. you've got a simmering revoter
too when hezbollah went into syria, the rebels said if you don't get out, we'll attack you at home, which means lebanon. the big fear that fans the flames of the sectarian in many lebanon. >> into absolutely. the white house is focusing on the region and unrelated development involving iran, president obama today making a personal push for congress to delay any sanctions against the iranian government. the president has been meeting today with a bipartisan group of senate leaders and updating them on the international negotiations that have been taking place, trying to curb tehran's nuclear program. the president wants lawmakers to simply give diplomacy another chance. >> we're going to take a closer look at the diplomatic effort and the u.s. position later this hour. we'll have a discussion about that. meanwhile, it's a royal mission for prince harry. it would be, any mission would be royal. he's not known to shy away from a challenge. but this next one would test his strength. >> he looks really cold. the race to the south pole coming up. plus, the latest from the tornado disaste
16,200, 16,250 in the dow before end of the month. i don't think really anything different. we did get a settlement above 16,000 yesterday. settlements are important closing prices. stuart: you've been specific and right in the past and we're holding you right there, larry. we'll check later. i want to continue this with john layfield, he knows a thing or two about investing, live from bermuda, must know what he's talking about. john, is this party going to end anytime soon for stocks? >> no, i agree with larry, i don't know about 16-2, or 16-25 by the end of the month. he's a smart guy and right about 16,000, but i do see the market continuing to trend upward because there's no place else to put your money with what miss yellen the new fed chief is going to do. continuing ben bernanke's exact claim with the fed of easy money and the buybacks, the only place to put money right now, real or artificial is the market. stuart: we hear you, john, stay right there. come back to you in a moment. some individual stocks, actually first of all, look at the dow, from the futures i thought we
on in that individual market. maybe we don't have a number or today, but it would be great to get that data and if we ave to get it from insurers we should have a number about what that annual rate has been my sense is we are probably following that pretty today. ame people are saying what is normal churn in the individual and trying to site it as the end all, be all problem and anyway to shed light on those issues. of the the discussion individual market, the data again that continues to be itedes our projection of what would happen with the affordable care account is a look back at market. somewhere between 40 and 60% of turn over on a regular basis. individual market contracts are year so it's not unusual to policy or e same practice a year later. they're an continuous work benefit. individuals who are in the market want to get insurance. don't have a workplace insurance and they're not medicare eligible and not a veteran. they want insurance, and often truggle with not only price increases at about 16% a year average but everyone is edically underwritten so any illness or disease could block you
before coming. >> they don't have to. >> reporter: his first campaign and hard fought republican primary ended in victory with support from tea party members. the charge he faces today is a misdemeanor with a maximum sentence of six months in prison. his florida neighbors responded to word of his arrest. >> i think it's going to be a new career for him. there's no way to recover from that. >> reporter: he got the sentence first offenders in these cases usually get probation with the charges later dismissed if there are no more violations. as for what happens next, the house speaker john boehner says that's up to the congressman, his family and his constituents. >> pete williams outside the courthouse this morning. >>> we move on to the war in afghanistan and an agreement that might keep the u.s. there for another decade or longer. richard engel broke this story and joins us from kabul. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, savannah. thousands of afghan officials are starting to gather here in kabul to vote starting tomorrow on a joint u.s.-afghan security agreement that if pass
's in the package? and he said, don't you remember? yesterday i told you that i would be bring something curtain rods this morning, and on thursday afternoon, when he asked me to ride home with me, i said, sure, and then a few minutes later, i asked him, lee, today is not friday. today is thursday. and he says, i know that. and then that's when he said he was -- he told me that, i'm going to go out to see marina and get some curtain rods because she had made some curtains for him, and he was going to get the curtain rods where he could hang the curtains in his room at the rooming house. >> did you ever see -- i'm sorry. did you ever see him bring that package into the depository? >> no, i did not. i did not see lee -- lee had the package with him and he walked from where the parking lot where i had to park my car. he had the package with him and he did good into the back of the depository, going up the steps of the loading dock. >> you since then, even though the warren commission talked to you later on, that had to be the rifle, but you question whether it as a rifle. didn't seem like the size
should pass a budget that cuts things we don't need and closes tax loopholes that don't help create jobs so we can free up resources for the things that do create jobs and growth. building new roads. building new bridges and schools and airports. that creates jobs. >> too many americans still cannot even access the online exchanges and for the few that have, they are experiencing sticker shock. the president told us that obama care is more than a website. i agree. it is more than just a website, and the problems run far deeper than a few technological glitches. >> the white house released a progress report on the website fix saying it is improving with users waiting less than a second for wages to load, compared to eight. they are work to go improve application process. wanda summers and ed o'keefe. good morning to you both. thanks for joining me. >> good to see you, alex. >> as the the house and senate negotiators met on tuesday, they are just waiting to reach a deal and we reach the debt ceiling february 7th. will it turn into another 11th hour fight? or might we get something done unt
don't sacrifice sovereignty. we don't change in the american loss to advance our interests and we advance our brand and value system. i thank you for giving me an opportunity to share those thoughts with you. >> thank you. senator flake. >> thank you. if i could follow-up with regard to the case the supreme court is currently hearing, on the versus u.s. mr. thornburgh, were you surprised when you heard the federal government was actually suing -- or using treaty or convention in order to bring charges against an individual, a chemical weapons treaty? were you surprised this was used in this fashion? >> yes. >> if you're surprised by that, what can reassure us that you won't be surprised that this treaty is used for similar purpose? >> i think by that time the supreme court would've thrown out data, the basis for it. >> but the fact it even brought and it's survived one challenge, gone up one level as well. >> let me mention that it's sad to say the department justice doesn't always act wisely. and that there are occasions when mistakes are made in the pursuing of cases and controv
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